If you work in 2 or more EU countries for 2 or more employers

If you work for 2 of more employers in 2 or more EU (European Union) countries, it is not always clear which country's social insurance schemes cover you. This will depend on how many hours you work in the country where you live, or on where your employers are based.

  1. If you live in an EU country

    We determine where you are insured by looking at the number of hours you work in the country where you live.

    • If you work at least 25% of your working hours in the country where you live, you will be covered by the social insurance schemes of that country.
    • If you do not work (or you work for less than 25% of your working hours) in the country where you live, and if your employers are based in different EU countries, read the examples to see where you are insured.
Example 1

You work for 2 employers, one of whom is based in the country where you live

Mark works for 1 Dutch employer based in the Netherlands, and 1 German employer based in Germany. Mark lives in the Netherlands. If he works less than 25% in the Netherlands, he will be insured in Germany.

Example 2

You work for 2 or more employers in 3 different countries, but you do not work in the country where you live

Sophie works for 1 Belgian employer in Belgium, 1 French employer in France and 1 German employer in Germany. Sophie lives in the Netherlands, but she does not work there. Sophie is insured in the Netherlands because she lives there.

Sometimes it is not immediately clear which country' social insurance schemes cover you. In that case, we determine the country where you are insured. We can do this if you:

  • work for 2 or more employers who are based in different EU or EEA (European Economic Area) countries
  • work as a self-employed person at locations in 2 or more EU or EEA countries
  • receive an employment benefit from an EU or EEA country, in addition to working for a different employer in a different EU or EEA country 

If you want to know which country’s social insurance schemes cover you, contact us.

If a non-Dutch social insurance organisation or tax office asks you for a certificate or statement of ‘applicable legislation’, you can get this from us.

If you are going to work in more than one EU country, you must inform the social security organisation in the country where you live. If you live in the Netherlands, you should inform the SVB. You are obliged to do this by law.

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Version: 1 September 2022