See if you will remain insured in the Netherlands

If you are going to work outside the Netherlands, we will look at the country where you will be working and how long you were insured in the Netherlands before you left to decide whether you can remain insured in the Netherlands. Normally, you can only stay insured in the Netherlands if your work in the other country is temporary.

Choose the option that best describes your situation

If you are going to work outside the Netherlands for an indefinite period, you will stop being covered by the Dutch social insurance schemes. Instead, you will be insured in the country where you work.

If your employer is sending you to work outside the Netherlands temporarily, you will probably stay insured in the Netherlands. This is called ‘posting’. In that case, your employer can apply for an A1 certificate (certificate of coverage) for you.

You will also remain covered by Dutch health insurance if you start working outside the Netherlands temporarily. You can ask your Dutch health insurance provider for a European health Insurance Card (EHIC). With this card, you will be able to get medical care outside the Netherlands.

If you start working outside the Netherlands as a self-employed person on a permanent basis, you will stop being covered by the Dutch social insurance schemes. Instead, you will be insured in the country where you work. 

If you only work outside the Netherlands temporarily, you can stay insured in the Netherlands provided you meet the conditions. We refer to this as ‘posting’.

What are the conditions?

You will remain insured in the Netherlands if:

  • you are going to work in an EU (European Union) or EEA (European Economic Area) country
  • you worked in the Netherlands as a self-employed person for at least 2 two months prior to your posting
  • your work activities outside the Netherlands are the same as your work activities in the Netherlands 
  • You pay your social insurance contributions to the Dutch Tax and Customs Administration (Belastingdienst
  • you are a national of a country of the EU (European Union) or EEA (European Economic Area), or you have a residence permit which allows you to work in the Netherlands 

If you are going to work outside the EU or the EEA

If you are going to work in a country that is not a member of the EU or the EEA, you can apply to us for an A1 certificate (certificate of coverage). You will need this certificate if you are going to work in: the United States of America, South Korea, Canada (including Quebec), Israel, Japan, Chile, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man.

You should register as a self-employed person in the country where you work. We recommend that you ask the authorities in that country to explain exactly what social insurance schemes you come under.

If you are going to work in Belgium

If you are going to work temporarily in Belgium as a self-employed person, inform Limosa in Belgium about this before you go.

You can read more about working in Belgium on the webiste of the Bureau for Belgian Affairs.

If you work in more than one country

It will not be immediately clear which country you are insured in. You can read more about this on the page ‘If you are self-employed in more than 1 country’.

If you live in the Netherlands but you sometimes go to another country to perform, you will remain insured in the Netherlands if:

  • you are going to perform in an EU (European Union) country or treaty country
  • you are a national of a country of the European Union (EU) or a treaty country. Or you have a residence permit that allows you to work in the Netherlands
  • In addition to this:

  • you must be working for a Dutch employer who pays social insurance contributions for you to the Dutch Tax and Customs Administration (Belastingdienst), or
  • perform as a self-employed person and pay contributions to the Belastingdienst yourself

Make sure that you do not pay contributions in both countries

Non-Dutch clients often ask for proof that you are covered by the social insurance schemes of the Netherlands. You can prove this with an A1 certificate (certificate of coverage). This means that your non-Dutch client must not make any deductions for social insurance contributions from your fee (wages). You are still insured in the Netherlands and you already pay contributions here. 

NB: there are some countries where you will not be allowed to perform if you do not have an A1 certificate.

If contributions have been paid for you in 2 countries

If social insurance contributions have been deducted from your fee for a performance outside the Netherlands, you can ask for a refund using the contact form. State the country you worked in on the form. We will let you know within 1 week where you should go to ask for your contributions back.

If you are going to do an internship in another country as part of your studies in the Netherlands, you will normally stay covered by the Dutch social insurance schemes. This means that your school does not have to apply for an A1 certificate (certificate of coverage). Your school or college should be able to tell you more about this.

If your employer in the Netherlands is sending you to do an internship or training course in another country, you can stay insured in the Netherlands if:

  • your employer continues to pay your wages during your internship or training
  • your employer pays social insurance contributions for you to the Dutch Tax and Customs Administration (Belastingdienst)
  • you are doing your training or internship in a country of the EU (European Union) or in a treaty country 
  • you are a national of a country of the European Union (EU) or a treaty country, or you have a residence permit which allows you to work in the Netherlands

An A1 certificate is proof that you are covered by the social insurance schemes of the Netherlands. Your employer can request this certificate from us.

If you have an internship contract with an employer based outside the Netherlands, and you are being paid for the internship by this employer, you will stop being insured in the Netherlands.

If you work for a company that transports persons or goods to countries of the EU (European Union) or EEA (European Economic Area), you will normally stay insured in the Netherlands if:

  • you live in the Netherlands, or
  • you live in another EU country and you work for less than 25% of your working hours in that country

Your employer will deduct social insurance contributions from your salary or wages. An A1 certificate (certificate of coverage) is proof that you are covered by the social insurance schemes of the Netherlands. In some countries, you are not permitted to work without this certificate.

There are a few exceptions to this rule:

You live outside the Netherlands

If you live outside the Netherlands and you work in the Netherlands as well as in 1 or more other EU countries (for example as a coach driver, lorry driver or on an inland ship), your employer must ask the social security organisation in the country where you live to take a decision on where you are insured. If they decide that you are covered by the social insurance schemes of the Netherlands, your employer must send us a written application for an A1 certificate within 2 months.

You work at least 25% of your working hours in your country of residence

If you do not live in the Netherlands and you work at least 25% of your working hours in the EU or EEA country where you live, you will be insured in that country. If your employer is registered as an employer in the country where you live, you will be covered by the unemployment benefit, incapacity benefit and old-age pension schemes in that country.

You work as a member of a cockpit or cabin crew in civil aviation

If you are a member of a cockpit or cabin crew working in civilian aviation, you will be insured in the country where your home base is. If your home base is in the Netherlands, you will be covered by Dutch social insurance.

You are a Rhine Boatman

If you work on board a Rhine boat, you will be covered by the social insurance schemes of the country where the boat's operator is based.

Inform the authorities that you are working in more than one country

If you are going to work in more than one country, you must inform the social security organisation in the country where you live. If you live in the Netherlands, you should inform the SVB.

Your Europe - This page belongs to an advice network of the European Union
Your Europe - This page belongs to an advice network of the European Union

Last check: 1 January 2022