Child benefit

If your child is living away from home temporarily

If it is not possible for you to raise and care for your child at home, you may still be able to get child benefit.

When is your child considered to be living away from home?

The SVB will consider your child to be living away from home if he or she spends fewer than 4 nights a week at home.

If your child is away from home for less than 6 months, for example, for a holiday, or to go into hospital, he or she will still be considered to be living at home. After 6 months, the SVB will consider your child to be living away from home.

When can you get child benefit for a child living away from home?

You get child benefit for a child who lives away from home if:

  • you pay at least € 416 per quarter towards the support of your child
  • your child earns less than € 1,265 net per quarter

If your child is under 16, it does not matter how much he or she earns.

When can you get child benefit at twice the basic rate?

You can get child benefit at twice the basic rate if your child is living away from home:

  • because of illness or a disability, or
  • for education, and
  • you contribute more than € 1,103 per quarter towards the child's support, and
  • your child does not earn more than € 1,265 net per quarter

If your child is under 16, it does not matter how much he or she earns.

You can get child benefit at twice the basic rate if your child is living at home and:

  • is aged 3 to 17, and
  • has a positive recommendation from CIZ

You cannot get child benefit at twice the basic rate if you visit your child for 45 days or more during a quarter

If your child lives away from home, you can get child benefit at twice the basic rate as long as you do not spend more than 45 days a quarter visiting the child.

If you or the other parent pays a number of short visits to your child during a quarter (for example, 2 or 3 weeks), we will add the visiting periods together. We will also do so if you and the child's other parent visit the child in turn. If the child's parents, or one of the parents, spends more than 45 days a quarter with the child, we will consider the child to be living at home, and you will get child benefit at the basic rate.

If you visit your child in a particular quarter, and your visit continues into the next quarter, your visit may not last more than 45 days either.

Example: you start visiting your child on 21 June and your visit ends on 9 August. That makes a total of 50 days:10 days in the 2nd quarter and 40 days in the 3rd quarter. You will get child benefit at the basic rate for the 3rd quarter.

If your child regularly comes home for holidays or at the weekend, it makes no difference how long he or she stays with you.