AOW pension

What we mean by 'living with a partner'

You are treated by the SVB as living with a partner if you are unmarried and sharing a household with one other unmarried adult. You qualify as living with a partner if:

  • you live in the same house with someone who is 18 or over, and
  • you and the other person both contribute to the household

Contributing to the household is defined as:

  • making a financial contribution to the household expenses, or
  • taking care of each other in the household in another way.

A financial contribution refers to housing costs, living expenses and other expenses. The financial contribution to the household expenses should be substantial and be made with some regularity. Taking care of each other includes doing household chores and shopping, cooking, or caring for each other in the event of illness. Such care should also be substantial and be provided with some regularity.

The adult person you are living with is referred to as ‘your partner’. This can be your relationship, friend, brother or sister, or grandchild, but not your child or your father or mother. Persons who are treated a living with a partner are entitled to a pension based on 50% of the Dutch net minimum wage.

Some examples are given below.

  • Life partner

    You are in a relationship with Robert (aged 64), who is living with you and pays his share of the groceries and other household expenses. He also does the cooking, tends the garden, helps cleaning and does odd jobs around the house. 

    You are entitled to a pension at the rate for a person living with a partner because Robert and you are considered to be sharing a household. After all, Robert contributes to the household financially and otherwise. You would be considered to be sharing a household even if his contribution was only financial or if it only consisted of doing part of the household chores.

  • Own child

    Your daughter Sandra (aged 32) is living in with you. She pays her share of the fixed costs, such as the rent, groceries and energy. She also helps in all sorts of daily chores, such as cooking, shopping, cleaning and odd jobs around the house. 

    You are entitled to a pension for a single person, even though both you and Sandra contribute to the household, financially and otherwise. However, because it is your own child you are living with, Sandra and you are not treated the same as partners.

  • Grandson

    Your grandson Jamie (aged 21) is a student who is living in with you. He occasionally pays for groceries and does odd jobs around the house from time to time.

    You are entitled to a pension for a single person. As Jamie does not contribute substantially to your household, you are not considered to be sharing a household with him.

Exceptions: in some cases, you will continue to receive an AOW pension at the higher rate for a single person.

Even if you live with someone, you may still qualify for a pension at the rate for a single person if you are living at the same address with: 

  • your own child, stepchild or foster child, or your father or mother
  • a grandchild aged under 18
  • another person who does not contribute to your household
  • two or more other adults, and all of them contribute to the household
  • someone with whom you have a commercial relationship
You will find more information in the leaflet entitled ‘AOW pension and sharing a household’.