AOW pension

If you live with more than one other adult

What are the consequences for your AOW pension if you are sharing a house with more than one other adult?

If you are married or in a registered partnership: your pension is based on 50% of the Dutch net minimum wage

If you are married to or in a registered partnership with one of the people living at your address, and you have reached your AOW pension age, you will receive an AOW pension based on 50% of the net minimum wage. If your partner has also reached his or her AOW pension age, he or she will receive a pension based on 50% of the net minimum wage, too.

If you are not married

If you share a house with more than one other adult, we will check whether your situation qualifies as living together. Under the terms of the SVB, you are living together if you are unmarried and sharing a household with one other unmarried adult, that is, if:

  • you live in the same house with someone aged 18 or over, and
  • you and this other person both contribute to the household

Contributing to the household is defined as:

  • contributing financially to the household expenses, or
  • taking care of each other in the household in some other way

Financial contributions refer to housing costs, living expenses and other expenses. The contributions must be substantial and be made with some regularity. Taking care of each other includes doing household chores, shopping, cooking, or taking care of each other in the event of illness. This care should also be substantial and be provided with some regularity.

If you are sharing a household with only one of the others, and he or she is not your own child, stepchild, or foster child, you will be treated as partners. As a result, your pension will be based on 50% of the Dutch minimum wage. When your partner also reaches the AOW pension age, he or she will be entitled to a pension based on 50% as well.

Which pension rate are you entitled to?

If you are unmarried and living with more than one unmarried adult, your pension rate will depend on your situation:

  • If all of you contribute to the household, you will be entitled to a pension for a single person, based on 70% of the Dutch net minimum wage.
  • If only you contribute to the household, you will be entitled to a pension at the rate for a single person.
  • If you and only one other person contribute to the household, you are considered to be sharing a household with that person. You are therefore entitled to a pension for a person living with a partner (based on 50% of the Dutch net minimum wage), even if you are living with more than one other adult.

Some examples are given below.

  • Partner and child

    You live with your partner Susan (aged 58) and your daughter Louise (aged 22). You and Susan are sharing the household expenses. Louise is still in education and occasionally pays for groceries. 

    You are entitled to a pension at the rate for a person living with a partner. You are sharing a household with Susan, who makes a substantial financial contribution to the household. Louise contributes hardly anything to the household.

  • Niece and daughter

    Your niece Anne (aged 49) and her child Emma (aged 29) are living in with you. Anne and Emma are both working and paying their share of the fixed costs, such as the rent, groceries and the energy bill. They also help in all sorts of everyday chores, such as cooking, shopping, cleaning and odd jobs around the house. 

    You are entitled to a pension at the rate for a single person because you do not form a couple with either Anne or Emma. All three of you contribute to the household, both financially and by taking care of each other. This means that you are sharing a household with both Anne and Emma.

  • Friends

    You are sharing a home with two friends, Peter (aged 59) and Ellen (aged 56). Everyone pays their own share of the expenses and does their chores in the household, such as preparing meals, doing odd jobs around the house, shopping and cleaning. You also take care of each other when one of you is ill.

    You are entitled to a pension for a single person because neither Peter nor Ellen is your partner and both of them contribute to the household expenses. You also take care of each other. This means that you are sharing a household with two other persons.

  • Brother and son

    After his divorce, your brother Mark (aged 55) and his son Sam (aged 20) moved in with you. You and Mark are sharing household expenses. Mark does the paperwork and prepares both of your tax returns. He also does the cooking from time to time and lends a hand in jobs around the house. Sam is a student with a small job on the side. He does not contribute to the household expenses and is mainly at home for his studies. 

    You are entitled to a pension at the rate for a for a person living with a partner. You and your brother are sharing household expenses, and he also helps in the household. Sam pays nothing and he does not help in the household. In other words, he does not contribute to the household. This means that you are sharing a household with one other person: Mark.