AOW pension

If you are going to get married or start living with someone

People who are married or living with someone do not receive the same amount of AOW pension as people who live on their own.

If you live on your own, you will receive an AOW pension based on 70% of the net minimum wage. If you get married or start sharing a household, you will get an AOW pension based on 50% of the minimum wage. If you and your partner have both reached the AOW pension age, you will therefore get a combined total of up to 100%.

If you and your partner are married or in a registered partnership

We make no distinction between people who are married or in a registered partnership. In either case, an AOW pension is paid at the rate for a married person (based on 50% of the net minimum wage). There is one exception, however. If you are married or in a registered partnership and you are separated from your partner, we will assume that you are living on your own if:

  • you and your partner live your own lives as if you were not married, and
  • you and your partner run your own separate households, and
  • this situation is permanent.

You will then receive an AOW pension at the rate for a single person (based on 70% of the net minimum wage).

If you are married or in a registered partnership and you and your partner live at different addresses for financial or practical reasons, you will receive an AOW pension at the rate for a married person, which is based on 50% of the net minimum wage.

If you are married and you and your partner start living separately, or if you live apart from your partner and get married, please contact us. We will then establish whether you qualify for the higher AOW pension rate for a single person.

What we mean by 'living with a partner'

The SVB will consider you to be living with a partner if you are unmarried and you are sharing a household with one other unmarried adult. In other words, if you:

  • are living in the same house as someone aged 18 or over, and
  • both of you contribute to the household

Contributing to the household is defined as follows::

  • contributing financially to the household expenses, or
  • taking care of each other in the household in some other way.

Financial contributions refer to housing costs, living expenses and other expenses. The contributions must be substantial and be made with some regularity. Taking care of each other includes doing household chores, shopping, cooking, or taking care of each other in the event of illness. This care should also be substantial and be provided with some regularity. 

The adult with whom you are living is referred to as your ‘partner’. This may be your relationship, a friend of either sex, or a brother, sister or grandchild, but not your own child, or your father or your mother. If you are living with a partner, you are entitled to an AOW pension based on 50% of the Dutch net minimum wage.

The two-house rule. What if you both have a house?

If you spend more than half your time in the same house as another person aged 18 or over, and you both have your own house, you may not be considered to be living with a partner. This situation is known as the two-house rule. To be eligible for the two-house rule, you have to meet the following conditions:

  • you are unmarried
  • you each have your own home (whether rented or owner-occupied) or rented sheltered accommodation or communal housing, or accommodation based on usufruct or real right of occupation
  • you are both registered with the municipality as living at your own address
  • you pay all the costs of your own home
  • you have unrestricted use of your home
  • What do we mean by 'unrestricted use of your home'?
    • You do not rent out or sublet your home.
    • There is no-one else living in your home (with the exception of a child/stepchild/foster child of yours who is under 18).
    • There is no-one else registered as living at your address (with the exception of a child/stepchild/foster child of yours who is under 18).
    • Your home is not encumbered with usufruct or right of use or occupation for anyone else (these are rights that generally give right of residence).
    • Your home has not been cut off from gas, water or electricity.

NB: the two-house rule does not apply if you rent a room or live in a holiday home.

If you meet the conditions for the two-house rule, you will get an AOW pension at the rate for a person living alone, which is based on 70% of the net minimum wage.

If you do not meet the conditions, you will be treated as living with a partner if you share the household costs or look after each other. You will then get an AOW pension at the rate for a person living with a partner, which is based on 50% of the net minimum wage.

Not included under the definition of living with a partner

You will not be considered to be living with a partner if you share a house with:

  • your own child, stepchild or foster child, regardless of their age
  • your mother or father
  • a grandchild under the age of 18
  • a boarder. In that case, you are each regarded as having your own accommodation. However, your house must be arranged for separate occupation, e.g. so that each person has his or her own living room and bedroom. In addition, you must be able to prove the commercial nature of the relationship with a contract, and reasonable market prices must have been agreed. Your administration must also show that the agreed rent or services have actually been paid for.

You may be able to receive an AIO supplement

If you live in the Netherlands, do not receive a full AOW pension, and have little or no income apart from your AOW pension, you may qualify for a supplement on top of your pension: the AIO supplement.