AIO supplement

What we mean by 'living with a partner'

The SVB will consider you to be living with a partner if:

  • you live in the same house with someone who is 18 or over, and
  • you both contribute to the household

Contributing to the household is defined as:

  • contributing financially to the household expenses, or
  • taking care of each other in the household in some other way

Financial contributions refer to housing costs, living expenses and other expenses. The contributions must be substantial and be made with some regularity. Taking care of each other includes doing household chores, shopping, cooking, or taking care of each other in the event of illness. This care should also be substantial and be provided with some regularity.

'Partner'

We refer to the person you share a house with as your 'partner'. This may be your relationship partner, a friend (male or female), or a brother, sister or grandchild, but not your own child, or your father or your mother. If you live with a partner as defined above, you will only get an AIO supplement if your and your partner's joint income is less than €1,485.29 net per month. In addition, your joint assets may not be more than €12,240.

AIO supplement at the rate for a single person, despite living with another adult

If you share a house with someone, you can still get an AIO supplement at the rate for a single person if the person you live with is: 

  • your child, stepchild or foster child aged under 21
  • your mother or your father
  • a grandchild aged under 18
  • a person with whom you have a commercial relationship (renting or letting a room)
If your child is aged 21 or over, he or she may count as a co-resident. This also applies to your father or mother.

You are living with more than one adult

If you are unmarried and living with more than one adult, they may count as co-residents if they are aged 21 or over, even if one of them is your partner. 

In that case, the co-resident rule applies to you. Persons who receive education and persons with whom you have a commercial relationship are not taken into account under the co-resident rule.

If all the other persons you live with are under 21 and none of them is your partner, you will be treated as a single person.

Examples for AOW pension plus AIO supplement

The AIO supplement is paid in addition to your AOW pension. Living with more than one other adult affects an AIO supplement differently from an AOW pension. To clarify things, the examples given here refer to unmarried AOW pensioners with an AIO supplement who are living with more than one other adult. The assumption is that the AOW pensioner contributes to the household.

  • Partner and child

    You live with your partner Susan (aged 58) and your daughter Louise (aged 22). You and Susan are sharing the household expenses. Louise is still in education and occasionally pays for groceries. 

    You are entitled to a pension at the rate for a person living with a partner. You are sharing a household with Susan, who makes a substantial financial contribution to the household. Louise contributes hardly anything to the household.

  • Niece and daughter

    Your niece Anne (aged 49) and her child Emma (aged 29) are living in with you. Anne and Emma are both working and paying their share of the fixed costs, such as the rent, groceries and the energy bill. They also help in all sorts of everyday chores, such as cooking, shopping, cleaning and odd jobs around the house. 

    You are entitled to a pension at the rate for a single person because you do not form a couple with either Anne or Emma. All three of you contribute to the household, both financially and by taking care of each other. This means that you are sharing a household with both Anne and Emma.

  • Your brother and his son

    After his divorce, your brother Mark (aged 55) and his son Sam (aged 20) moved in with you. You and Mark share the household expenses. Mark does the paperwork and prepares both of your tax returns. He also sometimes does the cooking, the shopping and odd jobs around the house. Sam is a student with a small job on the side. He only occasionally contributes to the household expenses and is mainly at home for his studies.

    AOW old age pension: you are entitled to a pension at the rate for a person living with a partner. You and your brother are sharing household expenses, and he also helps in the household. Sam pays almost nothing and does not help in the household. In other words, his contribution to the household is minimal. This means that you are sharing a household with one other person: Mark.

    AIO supplement: you share a household with your brother Mark, who is classed as your 'partner'. Your AIO supplement is therefore based on the standard amount for a person living with a partner. Sam does not count as a co-resident, because he is still under 21. When he turns 21, he will count as a co-resident, unless he is still a student. As soon as he counts as a co-resident, the co-resident rule will apply for you.